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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm PST
inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
his long captainity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed s
Dec 5, 2013 3:30pm PST
with nelson mandela. mr. swatwali, thank you for joining us. give us some thoughts, what it was like during the apartheid regime. tell us what it was like, eye specially on robben island in prison. >> well, let me first say that our people in south africa and the world have lost . >>> that's what we learned from nelson mandela. during the dark days with him on robben island. today he is seen as an icon of the world, whose teachings, as well as principles need to be embraced by all. he was embraced even by his own jailers, because he demonstrated that through the power of dialogue through the elements and two of reconciliation, people on different sides, former enemies, can come together. that's how -- we solve our intractable problems. we concluded that in order for us to create a new democratic society for a united and nonviolent south africa was to embrace all people. that was seen through the -- >> i have a pictures, mr. sexwale, of the cell. it's robben island. i think we'll be able to show our viewers, a cell where mr. nelson mandela spent so many years. there it is right there. awful
Dec 5, 2013 6:30pm EST
that i have wasted in prison. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released from the prison. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: released at the age of 72, remained vigilant that his country and freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today the majority of south africa, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1994 south african's castheir ballot in the first democratic election. >> this morning applause for the first black voter in history. >> reporter: mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight, but now this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the worl
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm PST
africa. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> one excludes the religious leaders, mr. mandela is the greatest person to have walked the face of the earth in human history. >> reporter: an icon not only for his fellow countrymen -- >> viva mandela! viva! >> reporter: -- but for the entire world. "nelson mandela." >> ladies and gentlemen. >> this is "headliners "headliners & legends" with lester holt. >> he is lauded the world over as a man of peace, a champion for the downtrodden. he suffered at the hands of racism and endured decades in prison only to emerge with his dignity intact, his spirit unbroken freedom fighter, ex-prisoner, nation builder. nelson mandela's legacy serves as a shining example not only for the people of the world today but for generations to come. >> reporter: nelson mandela's life begins far away from the turmoil, struggles and ultimate triumphs that will define his life. here in the transsky province of south africa, 550 miles south of johannesburg, mandela is born on july 18th, 1918. the name he is given will prove in a sense prophetic. >> nelson mande
Dec 6, 2013 5:30pm PST
at madison park high school when mandela arrived. >> mr. nelson mandela. [ cheers ] >> reporter: inside the school, pure excitement. >> you all have filled our hearts. >> reporter: this man was a student there. >> 23 years later i still remember that day as if it were yesterday. you heard about this guy in history and suddenly, you know, he's coming to your high school. it was a surreal moment. >> reporter: in detroit -- ♪ >> reporter: -- tens of thousands flocked to tiger stadium. owen beaver was in the motor city. >> i met him for the first time. i got to tell you, we embraced. >> reporter: it was a whirlwind trip. 8 cities, 12 days. stops in miami, los angeles, washington, d.c., and atlanta. >> to be so young and to meet a leader as great as mandela was a really big moment. >> reporter: this woman was just 10 years old at the time, on the tarmac in atlanta. >> i just remember looking in his face. even as young as i was, i remember thinking just what a kindness there was about him and his eyes thinking how amazing it was for somebody who had been through so much to not have a harden
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
. >>> and president barak obama paid his respects tog during a televised event. he credits mr. mandela with his first political action company against apartheid. this is some of what mr. obama had to say. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to forward the dpl that he set to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make to strive for a further worthy of his sacrifice. >> well, one of nelson mandela's biggest supporters was archbishop desmond tutu. he presided over a church service in capetown to remember his friend a short time ago. these pictures coming into us about 30 minutes ago and people listening to mr. tutu's every word about his friend. archbishop tutu also released a statement saying, we quote, over the past 24 hour years madiba taught us how to come together and to believe in ourselves and each other. he was a unifier from the moment he walked out of prison. we are relieved that his suffering is over, but our relief is drowned by our grief. may he rest in peace and rise in glory
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
Dec 7, 2013 3:00am PST
's death on thursday. he was 95 years old. mr. mandela's body is being prepared for his lying in state later this week. on tuesday, there will be an official memorial service in johannesburg. >>> number five, police are searching for four people believed to be behind the killing of an american school teacher. officials say 33-year-old ronnie smith was gunned down while he was jogging in the libyan city of benghazi on thursday. smith moved to libya just about a year and a half ago. he was teaching there. he was planning to return home to his family this month. >>> merrill newman, a veteran of the korean war, 85 years old, is back to see his family today. cnn's paula hancocks in seoul looks at newman's role in the korean conflict. >> reporter: putting on military fatigues in seoul, former members talk about the korean war. now in their 80s, these men were part of an anti-militant guerilla group. they say released american citizen merrill newman was one of their leaders. newman used to send orders to us indicating which island to infiltrate and occupy. then used to work on combined operat
Dec 6, 2013 5:30pm PST
, mr. mandela." he said "the name is nelson. welcome." so we became friends. >> reporter: for 18 of the 27 years he s:e mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of this walk there was no freedom, there was this. an eight foot square cell with a mattress on the floor for his bed and a bucket for a toilet. mandela was allowed one visitor a year for half an hour. mandela and daniels were among 30 political prisoners isolated in what was simply called "b" block. >> we sat on the brick. >> reporter: mandela and his fellow inmates worked long days in the yard sitting on bricks ordered only to look straight ahead they smashed slate into gravel with hammers. black inmates wore short pants in all weather. the apartheid regime's way of reminding them that all black men were considered boys no matter what their age. the yard is now just another stop on the robben island tourist route. but no visitor can imagine what it meant to eddie daniels when his jailors allowed the "b" block prisoners in the yard one night after six years being locked in by sun set. >> i looked up and
Dec 6, 2013 1:40am PST
government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
Dec 8, 2013 8:00am PST
first visit to america. warmly welcomed at the white house. >> mr. mandela, a man who embodies the hopes of millions. >> reporter: it was bill clinton with whom he would develop the closest bond. mandela, now president of south africa, visited the white house during the darkest days of the clinton presidency. he gave his friend a boost. >> our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. >> reporter: this friendship clinton treasures to this day. >> we just hit it off. i just adored him.ueriend. >> reporter: mandela, as an ex-president, met with george w. bush in 2005. but there was no love lost there. mandela was one of bush's harshest critics when it came to iraq. when we talked to bush about the ailing mandela earlier this year, there were no hard feelings. >> he promoted freedom. he was a really great leader. he was smart and capable. and made his mark. >> reporter: obama only met mandela once. ever so briefly as a junior senator. but his connection may be the most profound. it was mandela, he says, who awakened him to the wider world. inspiring him to political activism. >> he
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)